Trees

Since there isn’t much garbage to clean up (which is good) I thought I might talk about the trees in the park. The main ones are the Western Red Cedar and the Douglas Fir. There’s another one too, it’s a bit uncommon but you might find it if you look up at the leaves of the trees. It usually has bright green leaves and they won’t blend in with the other trees. Take a guess, let’s see if you’re right: it’s the big-leaf maple tree!

Now I’ll tell you about the stats of the trees. The Douglas fir is large to very large tree, with an average height of 20-60 meters. The Western red cedar has an average height of 30-53 meters. And lastly, the big-leaf maple has an average height of 9-21 meters. Pretty cool right? Here are some pictures that we took during the week, thanks for reading!

Glacial erratic in Harper Park
On top of the other glacial erratic in Harper Park (near the Smiling Creek bridge). Douglas firs, Western red cedars, and big leaf maples in the background.

Skunk Cabbage and Bear Poop

Last week, we saw bear poop and new skunk cabbage: not a coincidence!

Did you know skunk cabbage creates heat and smells bad because bugs like flies and beetles think it’s a dead animal? And thats good for the plant because from time to time they will land on other plants, right?  And then they will land on the skunk cabbage and it gets pollinated!

Bears love skunk cabbage too for a very weird but cool reason! And the link down here is why:

Naturespeak: Skunk cabbage is a bear’s BFF

Skunk Cabbage

Park Spark Week 3

Week 3 was not so hard as last week. We only got 1 bag of garbage this time so that’s good news.

I found out about this new app that my mom showed me that shows you what plant you’re looking at and all you need to do is take a picture of it and it’s incredibly cool. I’ll show you some photos of plants that live in Harper Park and the app itself:

https://www.picturethisai.com/